Join the team

I'm looking for creative and enthusiastic PhD, Masters and project students (foreign exchange/Part 4) with top academic record to join my research team. If you are interested, please email me your CV. Browse the site to find out more about my work and what I can offer students and commercial partners.

read more about my work
  • Thinking about postgraduate study at the University of Auckland - click on the image!

    Thinking about postgraduate study at the University of Auckland - click on the image!

  • Visual presentation of water-worked environments - click on the image!

    Visual presentation of water-worked environments - click on the image!

Sediment dynamics

Sediment dynamics

We use flumes to study the sedimentary processes that take place when individual grains (sediment) and water transform concurrently, dynamically and interactively. One of my main research interests is in sediment pattern characterisation, such as ripples and dunes, which are commonly observed at beaches ...
Read More
Near-bed flow fields

Near-bed flow fields

Studying near-bed flows over mobile sediment beds is challenging. There is the measurement challenge on the one hand, needing equipment that is suitable to provide near-bed flow data, which can be spatially and temporally decomposed. On the other hand, the mobile nature of the boundary does not allow ...
Read More
Underwater stereo-vision

Underwater stereo-vision

We developed the world's leading close-range 3D stereo-vision system for gravel-bed studies. It allows instant capturing of Digital Elevation Models (DEMs), resolving over 30 million points/m2. Recently ...
Read More
Density flows

Density flows

Sediment underflows, commonly known as turbidity currents, are a type of density flow which occur in deep oceans, lakes and river mouths. Our projects use ultrasonic Doppler velocity profiler (UDVP) measurements and photometric analysis to ...
Read More

PhD opportunities at the University of Auckland, New Zealand – 2018

 

Applications are invited for PhD projects being offered at the University of Auckland, New Zealand.

Project areas:

(1) Blockage in hydraulic structures, including bridges and culverts; jointly supervised with Dr Stefan Felder from WRL (Sydney, Australia)

(2) Influence of roughness on fish-passage hydraulics – ecohydraulics

(3) Sediment transport under climate and anthropogenic changes

 

 

Background: You will be a member of the Water-worked Environments Research Group in Auckland http://water.auckland.ac.nz/. Please check the website to learn more about our research work. You will work in our Water Engineering Laboratory. Ideally, applicants will have outstanding academic records from a top University and are highly motivated to take on a new challenge. You will be part of a research team that values diversity and creativity.

Scholarship: Funding covers all fees + NZD 25,000 pa stipend (tax free) for 3 years. PhD students will be based within the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Auckland, New Zealand, and supervised by Dr Heide Friedrich.

Requirements: You have a very good first degree/masters in hydraulic/civil engineering or physical sciences. Excellent written and oral English communication skills are essential. Candidates must also be eligible for admission to the PhD program at the University of Auckland. For more information on postgraduate studies at the University of Auckland, see https://www.auckland.ac.nz/en/for/future-postgraduates.html.

Special consideration: We are specifically encouraging students of Māori descent to apply. Doing so we aim to enable greater community involvement in our research and support the development and delivery of excellent Māori research. Māori are the indigenous Polynesian people of New Zealand. Whakapukahatanga Taiao is the Māori name for civil and environmental engineering. The name encompasses the branches of engineering that are directly associated with the environment or the natural world. Within the Māori worldview, people and the environment are directly connected, a sentiment summed up in the whakatauki (Māori proverb): “ko au te whenua, te whenua ko au”, “I am the land, the land is me”. The name Whakapukahatanga Taiao directly references the key role that civil and environmental engineering plays to establish these connections between people, the environment and world we live in.

Application: Please email CV, detailed academic records with grades and a brief outline on why you are interested in joining the research group to Dr Heide Friedrich (h.friedrich@auckland.ac.nz). Informal inquiries are welcome.

Applications are invited until positions are closed. Successful candidates should be available to start on or before, 1st October, 2018.

For more information, please email h.friedrich@auckland.ac.nz.

Skip to toolbar